Today’s poll: Is it fair or unfair to offer uni places for applicants with lower grades who come from challenging situations?

A report today highlights how universities are offering places to some children from state schools with lower A-level grades than those from, for example, independent schools.

The situation is mainly relevant for those from disadvantaged backgrounds, who live in low participation areas or who attend poorly performing schools.

Is such an approach fair or unfair?

 

Is it fair or unfair to offer uni places for applicants with lower grades who come from challenging situations?

 

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Categories: Higher Education, Poll and Secondary.

Comments

  1. The Mail implied pupils from independent schools were being shoved aside by less-qualified state-educated peers from a disadvantaged background.  But the figures supplied by the Mail show it’s a less significant occurrence than the paper implies:
    ‘Around 54 per cent of the qualifications held by independent school pupils entering the 20 universities were either A* or A at A-level. This fell to 44 per cent among state entrants.’

    It would appear 46% of independent pupils are admitted without a full clutch of A/A* grades while 66% of state educated pupils don’t have three A/A* grades.  But unis look at potential as well as grades and the Sutton Trust found in 2011 that pupils from comps outperformed their equally-qualified peers from private and state grammars when at uni.  It could make sense, then, to offer places to state-educated candidates with slightly lower grades because the higher grades of the independent/grammar pupils don’t translate into higher degrees.

    http://www.suttontrust.com/newsarchive/comprehensive-pupils-outperform-independent-grammar-pupils-university-degrees/

    And despite this so-called ‘social engineering’, the Mail admitted at the bottom of the article:
    ‘But those from the most advantaged areas are still seven times more likely to enter a university with the highest entry requirements than those from disadvantaged areas’.

Let us know what you think...