Thousands of children could be suffering from an undiagnosed condition that affects their ability to do mathematics

Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast have examined the prevalence of a developmental condition called Specific Learning Disorder in Mathematics, which is also known as dyscalculia. iNews reports.

By examining the mathematics performance of more than 2,400 pupils over a number of school years, they found that 112 of those pupils may have the condition – a similar number to those with dyslexia.

Dr Kinga Morsanyi, who led experts from the university’s School of Psychology in the study, said: “In society, there is sadly a widespread notion that you need a special talent to be good at maths, and that struggling with maths is normal for some people. But this was not the case and it’s not something we would accept if a pupil was unable to read.”

The researchers say it seems likely that children with persistent and serious difficulties with mathematics are not receiving specialist support – unlike children with dyslexia.

Dr Morsanyi said “A child with dyslexia is more than 100 times as likely to receive an official diagnosis and educational support, and even if a child is diagnosed with dyscalculia, there is no standard process in place to support them.” 

Read more  Thousands of children could be suffering from an undiagnosed condition that affects their ability to do mathematics

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