Teachers should ignore emails from ‘pushy parents’ demanding immediate replies about their children when they leave school for the day, minister says

Daily Mail is reporting that schools should tell teachers to ignore their emails when they leave work to avoid being pestered by parents, the education secretary says.

Damian Hinds believes the internet has ‘revolutionised’ communication between parents and teachers, but warns that at many schools it has gone too far.

In some cases, teachers are even being bullied on social media by parents.

In a speech today at the Bett Show in London, Mr Hinds will say schools must help ease the workload by allowing parental contact only during the working day.

He suggests parents should only use only official channels and that teachers should spend a set amount of time per day answering queries.

He also wants internal communications to be overhauled, so that teachers do not have to deal with constant daily updates from senior leaders.

It comes as the Government bids to reduce teacher workload to make the profession more attractive.

Schools are being given an extra £10million to help cut workload through technology.

Read more Teachers should ignore emails from ‘pushy parents’ demanding immediate replies about their children when they leave school for the day, minister says

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