Teachers need better training to combat child sex abuse, says charity

According to Sky News, the NSPCC’s charity Childline service was contacted by 4,500 children and young people in 2018-19 who said they had been sexually exploited – a 16% rise compared to the previous year. 

Shaun Friel, head of Childline, said: “The increase is incredibly significant when you consider how difficult it is for a young person to firstly recognise that they are being exploited and secondly to speak out given the grooming they’ve experienced and, quite often, the pressure they’re under not to tell anyone.”

Lucie, not her real name, is now 22 but was first abused by a man she met on an online chatroom when she was 12.

She told Sky News: “If primary school teachers especially had better awareness of child sexual exploitation it could really help. I had no specific lessons about grooming or abuse, or the dangers and risks associated with using the internet. Schools need to keep up with changing technology.”

Read the full article Teachers need better training to combat child sex abuse, says charity 

Please tell us your thoughts in comments or via Twitter ~ Tamsin

Is your school ready to provided clear, unbiased and informative RSE in 2020? How much training have the providers of these lessons had? Are you going to be teaching RSE, do you confident? Please tell us your thoughts in comments or via Twitter ~ Tamsin

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Categories: DfE, Infant, Learning, Mental Health, Primary, Safeguarding, Secondary, Teaching and Technology.

Comments

  1. It can start as early as Infant School when teachers fail to deal with incidents appropriately. If a child can’t articulate what happened sufficiently, then they’re not believed, so the teacher then punishes both kids, gets them to ‘make up’ and move on. The message this sends is the victim feels they share the blame for what happened to them and the perpetrator also thinks somehow the victim is to blame for his/her behaviour. The victim won’t then report further incidents and this follows them through life. Teachers either need help to improve their listening skills or employ a professional.

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