Teacher training free-for-all announced

The TES is reporting that university and school-based initial teacher training providers have been told they can take on as many trainees as they want from next year…

The free-for-all announced today by the National College of Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) comes in the wake of concerns about growing teacher shortages…

National allocations for the number of trainees for in each subject will remain. But universities and School Direct schools recruiting for September 2016 have been told they can take on as many trainees as they want until the national limit in each subject is met…

There will be some controls set to ensure a mix of School Direct, SCITT (school centred initial teacher training) and university-led courses. The NCTL has also said it will ensure no individual providers expand beyond a certain level and it will act to prevent significant geographical variation.

But the removal of institutional limits has been condemned by bodies representing universities.  

In a joint statement, Universities UK and Guild HE, said: “Within the fixed market that these changes introduce, there will be no guaranteed minimum intake level for university provider-led courses…”

More at: Teacher training free-for-all announced

 

Are the university providers right to be concerned at this announcement?

Does it represent a further swing towards the School Direct model?

Please let us know what you see as the implications – good and/or bad – from this announcement…

 

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Categories: Teaching and Training.

Comments

  1. TW

    Oh, the national limit in each subject thing.  If Schools Direct can’t fill it’s subject allocations for maths, languages etc will it be able to transfer the places to English, history etc?

  2. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove “Desperation” springs to mind – is this finally an admittance of a recruitment crisis? It will make little/no difference

  3. Man has a garden and is trying to grow lettuces, but so many are eaten by slugs, he gets few to eat.  Stupid advice: “Plant more lettuces”.
    Country is trying to get enough teachers, but so many of them leave the profession due to stress, workload and demoralisation there are not enough in classrooms.  Stupid advice:  “Train more teachers”.

  4. Man has a garden and is trying to grow lettuces, but so many are eaten by slugs, he gets few to eat.  Stupid advice: “Plant more lettuces”.
    Country is trying to get enough teachers, but so many of them leave the profession due to stress, workload and demoralisation there are not enough in classrooms.  Stupid advice:  “Train more teachers”.

  5. @TW Teach First is allowed to transfer unfilled places in one subject to another.  http://www.localschoolsnetwork.org.uk/2014/06/teach-first-shouldnt-get-preferential-treatment/

  6. jpjsavage

    LouisMMCoiffait SteveIredale SchoolsImprove the_college TeachSchCouncil a recipe for disaster. A catastrof&k (to quote Malcolm Tucker)

  7. LauraCornish511

    SchoolsImprove CornwallMaths articles like this really annoy me.Just lost my maths teaching job because of funding cuts and apparently 1/2

  8. AlfredoNokez1

    SchoolsImprove
    They perhaps regret squeezing the existence out of university ITT providers now!
    An admission of failed policies.

Let us know what you think...