Survey shows over half of parents want a shorter summer break to stop their child’s learning abilities declining

The Telegraph is reporting that a new survey has revealed that three out of four mums and dads believe their child’s academic abilities decline during the six week summer break.

Overall 74.8 percent of parents agree their child’s learning slips throughout the holiday, with over half believing it should be made shorter for consistency in their child’s academic ability throughout the year.

Curriculum Manager at Explore Learning, Charlotte Gater, said: “The summer is a time for fun and relaxation but this research has shown that many children’s academic abilities drop over the break, therefore undermining all the hard work they, and their teachers, have done over the year,” before adding that: “Learning can be done in a fun, effective way – through games, technology, extra tuition and interaction with their friends and the outside world – which all combine to keep their educational engagement ticking along over the break.”

Over half of parents questioned said their child spends time reading, with more than 1 in 5 pupils writing stories.

Some of the parents, 50.7 percent, say their child plays sports while a further 57.9 percent say their child rides a bike.

Early morning starts cause the most problems, as around half of parents agree their child dreads going back into the classroom with 56.3 percent saying their child struggles with getting into the school routine.

More at: Survey shows over half of parents want a shorter summer break to stop their child’s learning abilities declining

Are lengthy summer holidays a childhood rite of passage, or a needless luxury destined for the dustbin? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below or on Twitter? ~ Nellie

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Comments

  1. cmmccormack37

    SchoolsImprove we already have the shortest holidays in Europe – memory loss doesn’t seem to affect children from elsewhere

  2. valmartin75

    SchoolsImprove I certainly don’t want shorter hols. Let kids be just that, stop measuring constantly. Learning comes in many other forms.

  3. JoWebbTeach

    SchoolsImprove over half of teachers notice there is recruitment crisis which would be worsened by shorter summer hol.

  4. DiLeed

    JoWebbTeach SchoolsImprove Parents are in crisis over childcare not ‘decline in learning’. Whatever they tell a survey.

  5. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove One could argue the summer holiday is an opp to learn different stuff, but that might take some effort on the parents’ part

  6. Children and teachers likewise need the 6 week break. Parents have to be intentional about incorporating some form of learning activities in their holiday schedule.

  7. MrDeach27

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove I agree that summer can be amazingly rewarding providing parents are able to facilitate/get the time from work

  8. andylutwyche

    MrDeach27 SchoolsImprove Fair point but a long summer holiday is not a new phenomenon and the “disrupt learning” just seems a bit buzzword

  9. andylutwyche

    MrDeach27 SchoolsImprove Have they thought that the teachers may need a long summer break. Teachers too often forgotten hence shortage

  10. MrDeach27

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove indeed and indeed. My view is the summer is amazing for families and absolutely necessary practicalities aside

  11. MrDeach27

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove personally I need summer to reconnect with my own kids after being distracted for so long by other people’s

  12. andylutwyche

    MrDeach27 SchoolsImprove Quite; the vocal parents, I’d suggest, are generally the ones who regard school as free child care

  13. andylutwyche

    MrDeach27 SchoolsImprove Absolutely. Teacher’s aren’t allowed a life outside the classroom and parenting other people’s kids though…

  14. MrDeach27

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove prob true. Also worth reminding people that that learning experiences confined to the classroom are v limited

  15. andylutwyche

    MrDeach27 SchoolsImprove Absolutely! There’s more to life than passing exams even if politicians tell us otherwise

  16. Sigh

    Really? A “survey” by a private tuition company finds that children’s academic “abilities” drop when they are not in school? And this is being reported so credulously?

    It’s a pity that no details of the methodology or question wording are available from Explore Learning (http://www.explorelearning.co.uk/blog/2016/07/21/survey-reveals-how-parents-really-feel-about-the-summer-holidays/) – but they do provide us with a helpful quote from a “parent”:

    ***One mother who has witnessed first-hand the impact that the summer break can have on her children’s educational levels is Jazmin Speede from Palmers Green in London.  She has three children aged 10, 9 and 7.  She says: “The summer break can be a tough time, especially for my son, 9 year old Malachi, whose maths attainment certainly dropped before we took him to http://www.explorelearning.co.uk/palmersgreenregularly over the break.***

    They also, considerately, suggest:

    ***If you’d like to keep your children engaged with learning this summer, why not come to a free trial at an Explore Learning centre near you?***

  17. gcooksey

    SchoolsImprove onwards stop berating parents. Working parents face huge challenges over the summer with childcare. For many it’s so hard.

  18. gcooksey

    SchoolsImprove and I know there’s many I the staff room who’d acknowledge the summer dip in learning or is it remembering

  19. gcooksey

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove not sure I’d agree – our parents often see us as the professionals who are trained to know how to teach best

  20. andylutwyche MrDeach27 SchoolsImprove My younger daughter told me she often felt I put other people’s children before her.  That’s my shame.

  21. andylutwyche MrDeach27 SchoolsImprove My younger daughter told me she often felt I put other people’s children before her.  That’s my shame.

  22. andylutwyche MrDeach27 SchoolsImprove My younger daughter told me she often felt I put other people’s children before her.  That’s my shame.

  23. andylutwyche

    gcooksey SchoolsImprove Not saying all! Just the vocal ones who are the minority but make out that they’re the majority, noisily

  24. CurlyMan66

    andylutwyche gcooksey SchoolsImprove we actually have one of the shorter Sumer breaks in the western world, eg compare with USA

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