Study: Giving primary school pupils sexual abuse education will help them report offenders

The BBC is reporting a new study that suggests being taught about sex abuse in primary school more than trebled number of children who told adults they had been abused…

Children who have been on abuse prevention programmes are more likely to tell an adult if they have been abused, suggests a global study.

The researchers looked at data on some 6,000 children in seven countries.

The data “supports the need to inform and protect children”, said lead author Dr Kerryann Walsh, of Queensland University of Technology.

Dr Walsh was speaking ahead of publication of the review by the global independent research network Cochrane.

It focused on data from 24 trials where a total of 5,802 largely primary school-aged children took part in school-based prevention programmes.

These trials took place in the United States, Canada, China, Germany, Spain, Taiwan and Turkey and were judged to be the most scientifically robust ever conducted in the field…

The schools focused on consent with education on body ownership and “private parts”, when it is acceptable to touch, what “secrets” are acceptable, as well as how to avoid dangerous situations and who children should tell if they have been abused or are afraid…

Children who had taken part were more than three times more likely to disclose sexual abuse than those who had not…

 

See the report in full from Cochrane at: School-based education programmes for the prevention of child sexual abuse

 

How does the approach to abuse education in our primary schools stack up against the findings from this report?

Do we do enough to encourage prevention?

Please give us your insights and feedback in the comments or via Twitter…

 

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Comments

  1. Giving children age-appropriate information about sex gives them the confidence to resist and report those who would abuse them.

    Some argue that such information is itself a form of child abuse and destroys children’s ‘innocence’.  But innocence is crushed when children are abused – ignorance makes it easier for predators to manipulate children.

  2. Giving children age-appropriate information about sex gives them the confidence to resist and report those who would abuse them.

    Some argue that such information is itself a form of child abuse and destroys children’s ‘innocence’.  But innocence is crushed when children are abused – ignorance makes it easier for predators to manipulate children.

  3. Busy Mum

    And how will justice be guaranteed if it comes down to a child’s word against that of an adult? Could lead to adults being wrongly accused/convicted, especially if unscrupulous adults out to ruin other adults put ideas into children’s heads….

  4. LaCatholicState

    Janet2   Don’t assume parents need teachers and others to give them this information.  Parents are perfectly capable…and know and love their children in a way that teachers don’t.  And not all parents want their kids to have this knowledge in order to protect them.  There are other ways of protecting children without harming their innocence. 

    Also…I am very slow to accept any BBC report on the subject.  It’s not as though they are neutral on the question.  Odd.

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