Schools crisis looming as Manchester faces 25 increase in demand for primary places

The Manchester Evening News is reporting that Greater Manchester faces a huge shortage of school places over the next few years as demand soars.

According to figures from the Department of Education 15,700 new places may need to be created.

There were 230,000 children of primary school age in Greater Manchester in 2013/14 – the most recent figures available. But forecasts suggest that will rise by 12.5pc by 2018/19 to 258,500…

The number of secondary school age pupils in Greater Manchester is forecasted to rise by 19.3pc, from 152,000 in 2013/14 to 181,000 in 2020/21…

Manchester council’s lead member for schools, Rosa Battle, said: “We started planning for increased pupil demand in 2008 and have been developing long-term plans to address this need since then…

In June, the M.E.N. revealed that more than one in ten Greater Manchester infants are now taught in oversized primary classes.

There are 10,655 five to seven-year-olds in classes above the government’s 30-pupil legal limit, according to census data – up by a THIRD on last year…

The Department of Education stresses it invested £252.9m in Greater Manchester under the last government to help create 20,700 new primary places – and 5,700 secondary places – by building and remodelling schools. A further £138m is now being ploughed in for the next three years…

More at: Schools crisis looming as Manchester faces 25 PER CENT increase in demand for primary places

 

The latest in what is a growing list of cities coming to terms with the extend of the school places challenges they are going to be facing over the next few years.

 

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