Public school funding for military cadet forces diverted to state sector

The Telegraph is reporting that Public schools will lose millions of pounds of funding and support for cadet forces under plans to divert the money into the state sector…

Head teachers at leading public schools on Friday accused the Government of “robbing Peter to pay Paul” with the reforms, which represent the first cut in funding for existing cadet forces since the Second World War.

At present, 261 schools, three quarters of which are private, receive more than £26 million a year to fund their Combined Cadet Forces (CCFs).

The funding helps meet the cost of staff training, uniforms, rifles and other facilities.

However, David Cameron, who was a member of the cadet force at Eton, has pledged to introduce 100 new cadet units in state schools by the end of 2015.

This week ministers agreed to help fulfil that promise by sharing the funding enjoyed by existing CCFs with the state schools, after months of bitter in-fighting between the Ministry of Defence and the Department for Education…

Earlier this week, Mr Gove said that Britain is “poorer” because private school education are being “rationed overwhelmingly to the rich”…

In June 2012, David Cameron pledged to introduce cadet forces in 100 state schools to “open up new horizons” for secondary school children. The cost of running the new units, estimated at up to £40,000 a year per school, was supposed to be met by a combination of government funding, school budgets and philanthropists. This fell short, leading to tense discussions between ministries.

On Thursday, Philip Hammond, the Defence Secretary, and Mr Gove reached an agreement to share existing funding. Under the plans, 100 state schools will set up cadet units by the end of 2015. A further 250 are expected to follow suit…

More at: Public school funding for military cadet forces diverted to state sector

What do you think of the idea of setting up these additional 100 CCFs in state schools, and of the suggested redistribution of funding away from those currently existing in public schools? Good thing or, as the public school heads above suggest, ‘Robbing Peter to pay Paul’? Please let us know in the comments or via Twitter…

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Comments

  1. TW

    Best thing would be to abolish all of them.

    Use the American system of all recruits go through the same basic training and then choose the people with the abilities required for officer training.

  2. The expansion of the Combined Cadet Force in state schools is
    part of the DfE’s Military Ethos in Schools programme, which also
    includes ‘alternative provision with a military ethos’, the
    controversial Troops to Teachers scheme, and proposals for
    ‘academies and Free Schools…[that] use their freedoms to foster
    a military ethos.

    (http://www.education.gov.uk/childrenandyoungpeople/youngpeople/militaryethos/a00217000/military-ethos-in-schools).
    The programme raises many concerns, including: is it really just
    about developing children, or are providing employment for
    veterans and creating a new channel of recruitment into the
    armed forces (at a time when recruitment is struggling,
    particularly in the Reserves) big drivers? To look at the
    expansion of the CCF in particular: in a note written for him as
    part of the Military Ethos
    in Schools policy formation, Michael Gove was assured that
    ‘Cadets are not part of the
    armed forces and are not used for recruiting purposes.’(https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/military_ethos_in_schools#comment-42378) However, the MoD have acknowledged
    several times that the cadets are a powerful recruiting tool,
    most recently http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/10640052/Public-school-funding-for-military-cadet-forces-diverted-to-state-sector.html.

    At ForcesWatch, our research has shown that the youngest,
    most disadvantaged recruits into the armed forces are
    significantly more at risk of being killed and suffering
    mental health problems, among other issues.
    (http://www.forceswatch.net) Whereas the majority of private school
    pupils will go to university, and therefore if they join the
    armed forces they will join as officers, it is the state
    school pupils with the lowest qualifications that are likely
    to join the armed forces at 16 or 17 (the vast majority
    joining as minors join the Army). Surely, having a CCF in
    your school is likely to encourage pupils who are not
    continuing on to further or higher education to consider
    joining the armed forces. What are schools doing to ensure
    that these pupils consider the unique downsides of an armed
    forces career before they sign up?
    Another concern with the cadets is its inadequate and
    contradictory safeguarding measures. Disciplinary procedures for
    cadets follow MoD safeguarding procedure, where incidents are
    reported up the chain of command if it is deemed necessary to do
    so. In contrast, the adult volunteers of the CCFs follow DfE
    safeguarding guidance (http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201213/cmhansrd/cm130225/text/130225w0002.htm).
    How does this disconnect work in practice?  In the Merseyside
    Army Cadet Force abuse case from October 2013 there is
    evidence to suggest that staff were slow in their response and
    keen to avoid a
    public investigation (http://tinyurl.com/ptzfw8l;
    http://tinyurl.com/okvb92j).In addition, an Army Cadet Force Commandant recently
    revealed that volunteers removed from their position because of
    risk of harm
    to children were not mandatorily being referred to the Disclosure
    and Barring
    Service, and that cadets who are legally adults were not being
    subject to a DBS
    check (http://tinyurl.com/owhtsx2).

    For more information email

  3. lewis_stockwell

    SchoolsImprove public school forces must be funded differently to their public counterparts e.g CCF RAF vs ATC as latter is funded by RAF

  4. JohnClarke1960

    SchoolsImprove A sideshow to the dreadful things Gove is doing 2 Education. Who really cares about CCF in state schools? We want education!

  5. Hope this doesn’t get deleted this time!
    The expansion of the Combined Cadet Force in state schools is
    part of the DfE’s Military Ethos in Schools programme, which also
    includes ‘alternative provision with a military ethos’, the
    controversial Troops to Teachers scheme, and proposals for
    ‘academies and Free Schools…[that] use their freedoms to foster
    a military ethos.

    (http://www.education.gov.uk/childrenandyoungpeople/youngpeople/militaryethos/a00217000/military-ethos-in-schools).
    The programme raises many concerns, including: is it really just
    about developing children, or are providing employment for
    veterans and creating a new channel of recruitment into the
    armed forces (at a time when recruitment is struggling,
    particularly in the Reserves) big drivers? To look at the
    expansion of the CCF in particular: in a note written for him as
    part of the Military Ethos
    in Schools policy formation, Michael Gove was assured that
    ‘Cadets are not part of the
    armed forces and are not used for recruiting purposes.’(https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/military_ethos_in_schools#comment-42378) However, the MoD have acknowledged
    several times that the cadets are a powerful recruiting tool,
    most recently http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/10640052/Public-school-funding-for-military-cadet-forces-diverted-to-state-sector.html.

    At ForcesWatch, our research has shown that the youngest,
    most disadvantaged recruits into the armed forces are
    significantly more at risk of being killed and suffering
    mental health problems, among other issues.
    (http://www.forceswatch.net) Whereas the majority of private school
    pupils will go to university, and therefore if they join the
    armed forces they will join as officers, it is the state
    school pupils with the lowest qualifications that are likely
    to join the armed forces at 16 or 17 (the vast majority
    joining as minors join the Army). Surely, having a CCF in
    your school is likely to encourage pupils who are not
    continuing on to further or higher education to consider
    joining the armed forces. What are schools doing to ensure
    that these pupils consider the unique downsides of an armed
    forces career before they sign up?
    Another concern with the cadets is its inadequate and
    contradictory safeguarding measures. Disciplinary procedures for
    cadets follow MoD safeguarding procedure, where incidents are
    reported up the chain of command if it is deemed necessary to do
    so. In contrast, the adult volunteers of the CCFs follow DfE
    safeguarding guidance (http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201213/cmhansrd/cm130225/text/130225w0002.htm).
    How does this disconnect work in practice?  In the Merseyside
    Army Cadet Force abuse case from October 2013 there is
    evidence to suggest that staff were slow in their response and
    keen to avoid a
    public investigation (http://tinyurl.com/ptzfw8l;
    http://tinyurl.com/okvb92j).In addition, an Army Cadet Force Commandant recently
    revealed that volunteers removed from their position because of
    risk of harm
    to children were not mandatorily being referred to the Disclosure
    and Barring
    Service, and that cadets who are legally adults were not being
    subject to a DBS
    check (http://tinyurl.com/owhtsx2).

    For more information email

  6. This response from ForcesWatch keeps getting automatically deleted and they have email it to me to post:

    The expansion of the Combined Cadet Force in state schools is part of the DfE’s Military Ethos in Schools programme, which also includes ‘alternative provision with a military ethos’, the controversial Troops to Teachers scheme, and proposals for ‘academies and Free Schools…[that] use their freedoms to foster a military ethos. (http://www.education.gov.uk/childrenandyoungpeople/youngpeople/militaryethos/a00217000/military-ethos-in-schools). The programme raises many concerns, including: is it really just about developing children, or are providing employment for veterans and creating a new channel of recruitment into the armed forces (at a time when recruitment is struggling, particularly in the Reserves) big drivers? To look at the expansion of the CCF in particular: in a note written for him as part of the Military Ethos in Schools policy formation, Michael Gove was assured that ‘Cadets are not part of the armed forces and are not used for recruiting purposes.’ (https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/military_ethos_in_schools#comment-42378) However, the MoD have acknowledged several times that the cadets are a powerful recruiting tool, most recently http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/10640052/Public-school-funding-for-military-cadet-forces-diverted-to-state-sector.html. 
    At ForcesWatch, our research has shown that the youngest, most disadvantaged recruits into the armed forces are significantly more at risk of being killed and suffering mental health problems, among other issues. (http://www.forceswatch.net/) Whereas the majority of private school pupils will go to university, and therefore if they join the armed forces they will join as officers, it is the state school pupils with the lowest qualifications that are likely to join the armed forces at 16 or 17 (the vast majority joining as minors join the Army). Surely, having a CCF in your school is likely to encourage pupils who are not continuing on to further or higher education to consider joining the armed forces. What are schools doing to ensure that these pupils consider the unique downsides of an armed forces career before they sign up?
    Another concern with the cadets is its inadequate and contradictory safeguarding measures. Disciplinary procedures for cadets follow MoD safeguarding procedure, where incidents are reported up the chain of command if it is deemed necessary to do so. In contrast, the adult volunteers of the CCFs follow DfEsafeguarding guidance (http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201213/cmhansrd/cm130225/text/130225w0002.htm). How does this disconnect work in practice?  In the Merseyside Army Cadet Force abuse case from October 2013 there is evidence to suggest that staff were slow in their response and keen to avoid a public investigation (http://tinyurl.com/ptzfw8l; http://tinyurl.com/okvb92j).In addition, an Army Cadet Force Commandant recently revealed that volunteers removed from their position because of risk of harm to children were not mandatorily being referred to the Disclosure and Barring Service, and that cadets who are legally adults were not being subject to a DBS check(http://tinyurl.com/owhtsx2).

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