Public school becomes first to cut fees by 10 per cent amid concerns they are no longer affordable to middle classes

Millfield School in Somerset, whose former pupils include pop star Lily Allen and Olympian Duncan Goodhew, charges more than £38,000 a year for boarders aged 13 and over. The Telegraph reports,

But now it is is slashing its fees amid fears that British families are being “priced out” of private education by wealthy oligarchs and students coming from overseas.

Headmaster Gavin Horgan, who wants to treble the number of free places it offers to children from poorer families, is now calling on other public schools to follow his example.

He told The Sunday Times it is “the right thing to do” because the current climate is “unsustainable”, adding: “We are keener than ever to make our education available to everyone, regardless of their background and financial means.”

Mr Horgan is not the first leading headteacher to have spoken out about the perils of charging too much for private education. He is now launching a drive for donations to treble the number of bursaries it offers.

The initiative is being led by former pupil and swimming legend Goodhew, who won an Olympic gold medal for the 100 metres breaststroke at the 1980 Moscow Games.

Goodhew, who is dyslexic, was awarded a scholarship from Millfield which he credits with kickstarting his career as a world class athlete.

Catering for pupils aged two to 18, the school prides itself on delivering ‘an exceptional, all-round education” and boasts a “tremendously diverse” selection of students.

Read the full article Public school becomes first to cut fees by 10 per cent amid concerns they are no longer affordable to middle classes

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He told The Sunday Times it is “the right thing to do” because the current climate is “unsustainable”, adding: “We are keener than ever to make our education available to everyone, regardless of their background and financial means.”

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