‘Nine out of 10 don’t want under-fives tested’ says new poll

The Mirror is reporting a poll that, they claim*, suggests widespread public support for teachers’ demands to scrap tests for four-year-olds.

In the first major test of public opinion since the National Union of Teachers (NUT) called on Education Secretary Nicky Morgan to scrap them, nine out of ten members of the public agree. 

The findings come in a poll of 1,000 adults by daynurseries.co.uk, an online guide to day nurseries and nursery schools…

Davina Ludlow, director of daynurseries.co.uk, said: “We fully back the NUT’s concerns over reception baseline assessments, and as our poll indicates, so do many of the general public.

“We all need to work together to change the notion that ‘starting sooner means improved results later’.

“There is increasing concern that at such a young age, rigorous assessments only undermine natural development.

“The first few weeks of starting school are an important transition period when teachers should be focusing on children’s social and emotional wellbeing and ensuring their pupils are successfully settling in rather than spending this crucial time assessing them…”

More at: Nine out of 10 adults don’t want under-fives tested, says new poll

 

*Unless I am missing something, this “major test of public opinion” is actually just a poll on the daynurseries.co.uk website – just like our own readers’ polls – and (like ours) is in no meaningful way a properly sampled survey of public opinion. The Mirror may support the results of the poll but it is a bit disingenuous, to say the least, to position it as something it clearly isn’t.

That aside, your reaction to the comments made here by Davina Ludlow?

Please let us know in the comments or via Twitter…

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Comments

  1. JamieGBarry

    SchoolsImprove We did the baseline this year and it didn’t tell us anything we wouldn’t already have known. #WasteofTime

  2. JamieGBarry

    SchoolsImprove We did the baseline this year and it didn’t tell us anything we wouldn’t already have known. #WasteofTime

  3. JamieGBarry

    SchoolsImprove We did the baseline this year and it didn’t tell us anything we wouldn’t already have known. #WasteofTime

  4. JamieGBarry

    SchoolsImprove We did the baseline this year and it didn’t tell us anything we wouldn’t already have known. #WasteofTime

  5. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove Issue is and always has been “what can you usefully get out of academically testing a 4/5 yr old?” DfE obsessed on measures

  6. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove Issue is and always has been “what can you usefully get out of academically testing a 4/5 yr old?” DfE obsessed on measures

  7. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove Issue is and always has been “what can you usefully get out of academically testing a 4/5 yr old?” DfE obsessed on measures

  8. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove Issue is and always has been “what can you usefully get out of academically testing a 4/5 yr old?” DfE obsessed on measures

  9. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove DfE obsession with measuring “progress” (what they mean is “usefulness of teachers”) has led to this, nothing else

  10. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove DfE obsession with measuring “progress” (what they mean is “usefulness of teachers”) has led to this, nothing else

  11. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove DfE obsession with measuring “progress” (what they mean is “usefulness of teachers”) has led to this, nothing else

  12. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove DfE obsession with measuring “progress” (what they mean is “usefulness of teachers”) has led to this, nothing else

  13. iandewes

    I used the baseline test with 30 children last September. It wasn’t in the stressful for the children (most seemed to quite enjoy it) and it gave useful formative information about what the children could and couldn’t do.

  14. MadgeJesss

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove would be fun to put a bunch of D of E civil servants in a room with X section of 4 yr olds and lock door

  15. MadgeJesss

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove would be fun to put a bunch of D of E civil servants in a room with X section of 4 yr olds and lock door

  16. MadgeJesss

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove would be fun to put a bunch of D of E civil servants in a room with X section of 4 yr olds and lock door

  17. andylutwyche

    MadgeJesss SchoolsImprove They’d need to tuck their trousers into their socks to avoid leaving piles of mess on the floor

  18. andylutwyche

    MadgeJesss SchoolsImprove They’d need to tuck their trousers into their socks to avoid leaving piles of mess on the floor

  19. andylutwyche

    MadgeJesss SchoolsImprove They’d need to tuck their trousers into their socks to avoid leaving piles of mess on the floor

  20. wasateacher

    iandewes there is a huge difference between using a test to help a teacher as a diagnostic tool and having a test which labels a child for their school life and is used to punish and judge schools.

  21. wasateacher

    And in another post we see that there is an increase in poor behaviour and violence in primary schools.  I wonder why!!! (just for fun I have put 3 exclamation marks in a sentence which doesn’t start with ‘what’ or ‘how’ – will the site tell me off for shouting?

  22. TW

    wasateacher iandewes Exactly.  Some people seem to think children are too stupid to know what is being done to them.

  23. The daynurseries site gave pros and cons but the survey can’t be said to be accurate because respondents were self-selected.  (http://www.daynurseries.co.uk/news/article.cfm/id/44/should-teachers-boycott-tests-four-year-olds
    I’d like to see a professionally administered survey, properly weighted.  That said,  I’m against these tests.  Their only purpose is to provide a ‘base’ from which to measure children’s ‘progress’ (always supposed to be an uninterrupted vertical trajectory) and use the results to judge schools.  That’s not to say teachers shouldn’t assess children – they should – but it should be used to inform teaching not as a performance measure.

  24. berylkingston

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove Or to put it more accurately, ‘How much money can you make out of testing a 4/5 year old?’

  25. andylutwyche

    berylkingston SchoolsImprove Correct; ultimately what govt are doing is testing usefulness of teachers too

  26. berylkingston

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove A good teacher is someone who enables pupils to learn. Tests make money for the companies that run them

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