Nick Clegg: The Government is abandoning its duty over sex education

Nick Clegg, writing in the Evening Standard, is warning fthat the Conservatives’ announcement not to make sex education compulsory in schools ‘will have a lasting impact on the lives of thousands of children across England’.

Education Secretary Nicky Morgan said the Government would not be making age-appropriate sex and relationship education compulsory in all schools…

 The announcement flies in the face of a weight of evidence which shows learning about sex and relationships in schools helps protect young people from sexually transmitted diseases, sexual harassment and bullying, and unwanted pregnancies. The reason, as every parent or teacher knows, is obvious: the more you know, the more you can protect yourself…

… it is crucial that children learn the facts in an appropriate way so that they can navigate the pressures, fashions and dangers of a highly sexualised culture safely.

…thousands of curious kids get their understanding of sex from the playground rumour mill, television, advertising and — most perilously — from the internet… 

The fact is that by not talking to children about sex and relationships we are putting them at risk…

So why has the Government ignored all the evidence and advice?…

The real reason, I fear, is more mundane: the Government simply doesn’t want to offend Conservative backbenchers and the Right-wing media, many of whom believe that talking to children about sex encourages a permissive, amoral attitude towards it…

Ever since he won the last election, David Cameron has talked about using his second term to build a “social legacy”… 

Now they are quietly ditching compulsory sex and relationship education, despite all the evidence showing it helps keep kids safe. Some “social legacy”…

The Government has a duty to keep its citizens safe — and that is more important than ever when it comes to our children and young people. Ducking this issue may win them a few brownie points with the misguided moralisers but it is a dereliction of that duty…

More at Nick Clegg: The Government is abandoning its duty over sex education

 

Thoughts and reactions to Nick Clegg’s intervention in the debate on making PSHE and SRE compulsory for all schools?

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Comments

  1. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove In order to provide effective sex ed you need fully trained, specialist staff; spending money on ed isn’t part of govt plans

  2. melanie_coxon

    SchoolsImprove for some CYP school is the only means of learning re: healthy relationships.. PSHE..to stop is failing the needs of CYP.

  3. LaCatholicState

    SchoolsImprove This is a role for parents. Nick Clegg should think twice before dissing parental role. We dont take instruction from him

  4. LaCatholicState

    SchoolsImprove it is parents job to keep their children safe. Sex ed normalises adults speaking sexually to kids…and that is unsafe!

  5. TW

    If Clegg hadn’t wanted a Tory government doing Tory things he shouldn’t have spent five years keeping one in office.

    Next euro-nutter Clegg will be pretending Cameron got a good deal from the EU when the reality is that he asked for nothing and will get less.

  6. Education about relationships (not just sex) within high-quality PSHE is essential.  Children can often discuss things in class they would be embarrassed to discuss with their parents.  And they would receive impartial, objective information which gives them facts while asking them to consider their responsibilities.

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