New teachers need better behaviour management training, says review

The TES is reporting suggestions that practical guidance on how to deal with unruly pupils in the classroom should be an integral part of teacher training…

The Carter review of initial teacher training (ITT), which was published today, says that learning how to manage behaviour effectively is vital for trainees.

But some ITT providers are reluctant to broach the subject, telling the review that “behaviour management cannot be taught” and “trainees need to develop their own strategies – we can’t tell them what to do”.

The review disagrees, arguing that teachers should “start their careers armed with tangible strategies and techniques to draw upon”, and calls for behaviour management to be included in a new framework of core content for all ITT programmes…

But Mary Bousted, general secretary of the ATL teaching union, said the recommendation revealed “the government’s need to micromanage and failure to trust the profession”…

The Carter review also recommends that a common core for ITT should include evidence-based teaching, as well as child and adolescent development, assessment and special educational needs. More subject knowledge should also be included, the report adds.

The government has agreed, and says it will commission an independent group to look into developing the framework…

More at: New teachers need better behaviour management training, says review

 

Read the full Carter review at: Carter review of initial teacher training

 

Which side are you on – should behaviour management be a core component of teacher training or is it something teachers need to work out for themselves as they gain experience? Please let us know in the comments or via Twitter…

 

[advpoll id=”105″ title=”Today’s Poll” width=””]

 

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Categories: Teaching and Training.

Comments

  1. AndyDefinite

    SchoolsImprove Teachers have always needed more behav mgmt training!Sadly too few Uni/College staff have the experience to deliver! Ex Pru!

  2. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove This is the conclusion of bureaucrats. The best behaviour management stems from knowing the students, not generic action

  3. andylutwyche

    AndyDefinite SchoolsImprove But what works for one class don’t necessarily work for another. There is no “one size fits all” approach

  4. AndyDefinite

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove Yes that’s where true behav mgmt begins.half the issues I dealt with in schools were reactions to rigidity!

  5. AndyDefinite

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove Yes that’s where true behav mgmt begins.half the issues I dealt with in schools were reactions to rigidity!

  6. andylutwyche

    AndyDefinite SchoolsImprove Absolutely so therefore it’s difficult to provide adequate training as each situation is different

  7. andylutwyche

    AndyDefinite SchoolsImprove Can I apologise for my terrible grammar on the initial tweet too! Should read “doesn’t” #hangsheadinshame

  8. HughdjNicklin

    MaryMyatt More pressing need for a curriculum not correctly perceived as useless by most kids. Like #ReadWriteBuySellCookCleanFix

  9. GMacademic

    MaryMyatt SchoolsImprove keep them keen & you won’t have to treat them mean… Disengaged students become unruly, end of

  10. GMacademic

    MaryMyatt SchoolsImprove keep them keen & you won’t have to treat them mean… Disengaged students become unruly, end of

  11. GMacademic

    MaryMyatt SchoolsImprove keep them keen & you won’t have to treat them mean… Disengaged students become unruly, end of

  12. kevin hewitson

    Learning about behaviour management is like training people to fight fires, it comes after the cause has been overlooked, ignored or just plain missed. 

    Poor behaviour is in many cases “non compliant” behaviour, behaviour that does not fit within the expectations of the school. Such behaviour points to a need to examine the cause in order to prevent it occurring in the first place. When will we see poor behaviour for what it is, an expression of not having learning needs met, we can address the behaviour more effectively. This is what needs teaching, an understanding of learning needs and the effects of not having them met. 

    Articulate or mature individuals may be able to express in words what their needs are and which ones are not being met. Those not in a position to understand the link between how they feel and their needs and who do not have the vocabulary to express it tend to demonstrate their situation through actions, what we see as poor behaviour.

    Poor behaviour nearly always comes down to four needs not being met in part or in combination. William Glasser said “all we do is behave”. Consider how you would behave if your needs in the following areas were not being met:
    1) A sense of belonging, an identity, being known and understood by others
    2) Options, choices available to you do you can have in input in what happens to you.
    3) Fun, being able to celebrate achievement, sharing positive emotions, alleviating stress, learning to deal with challenge and adversity.
    4) Being heard, having a voice, being listened to, asked your opinion and views.

    At some point if you were frustrated in any of the above I would bet eventually you may resort to poor behaviour, at least as judged by those who manage, are responsible or direct you.

    You may like to ask too, “Is compliance a learning disability?” 
    http://wp.me/p2LphS-kd

  13. kevin hewitson

    Learning about behaviour management is like training people to fight fires, it comes after the cause has been overlooked, ignored or just plain missed. 

    Poor behaviour is in many cases “non compliant” behaviour, behaviour that does not fit within the expectations of the school. Such behaviour points to a need to examine the cause in order to prevent it occurring in the first place. When will we see poor behaviour for what it is, an expression of not having learning needs met, we can address the behaviour more effectively. This is what needs teaching, an understanding of learning needs and the effects of not having them met. 

    Articulate or mature individuals may be able to express in words what their needs are and which ones are not being met. Those not in a position to understand the link between how they feel and their needs and who do not have the vocabulary to express it tend to demonstrate their situation through actions, what we see as poor behaviour.

    Poor behaviour nearly always comes down to four needs not being met in part or in combination. William Glasser said “all we do is behave”. Consider how you would behave if your needs in the following areas were not being met:
    1) A sense of belonging, an identity, being known and understood by others
    2) Options, choices available to you do you can have in input in what happens to you.
    3) Fun, being able to celebrate achievement, sharing positive emotions, alleviating stress, learning to deal with challenge and adversity.
    4) Being heard, having a voice, being listened to, asked your opinion and views.

    At some point if you were frustrated in any of the above I would bet eventually you may resort to poor behaviour, at least as judged by those who manage, are responsible or direct you.

    You may like to ask too, “Is compliance a learning disability?” 
    http://wp.me/p2LphS-kd

  14. StephenG41HR

    MaryMyatt SchoolsImprove A key skill, so why is so little attention paid to it? NQT ‘struggling’ with BM is common feedback.

  15. DrDArmstrong

    SchoolsImprove hard not to agree with both statements: firm guidance required plus space to develop & practise personal skills

  16. DrDArmstrong

    SchoolsImprove hard not to agree with both statements: firm guidance required plus space to develop & practise personal skills

  17. DrDArmstrong

    SchoolsImprove hard not to agree with both statements: firm guidance required plus space to develop & practise personal skills

  18. DrDArmstrong

    SchoolsImprove hard not to agree with both statements: firm guidance required plus space to develop & practise personal skills

  19. DrDArmstrong

    SchoolsImprove hard not to agree with both statements: firm guidance required plus space to develop & practise personal skills

  20. beyondbehaviour

    joeslevin21 SchoolsImprove Quality CPD that gives new teachers key theory + strats + dvps reflective thinking = a good toolkit

  21. beyondbehaviour

    joeslevin21 SchoolsImprove Quality CPD that gives new teachers key theory + strats + dvps reflective thinking = a good toolkit

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