Nearly a third of teachers think their schools have not introduced performance-related pay

The TES is reporting that results of an exclusive poll by YouGov that suggests nearly a third of teachers believe their school has not introduced performance-related pay despite it being a statutory requirement for more than two years.

…By law, performance-related pay (PRP) systems – which allow teachers’ pay to progress only if targets set by schools are met – should have been in place since September 2013. But according to the YouGov survey of teachers, 31 per cent say their school has not introduced PRP, with a further 17 per cent stating that they “don’t know” if it has.

The remaining 52 per cent of the representative sample of 758 teachers said their school did have a PRP system in place.

But unions argue that the findings may reflect teachers’ lack of knowledge about their school’s pay policy, rather than whether PRP has been introduced…

The YouGov poll does reveal a marked discrepancy between headteachers and classroom teachers as to whether or not they think PRP operates in their school. Nearly all (98 per cent) of the headteachers polled said the system had been introduced for their staff, but only 42 per cent of classroom teachers gave the same response…

More at: Nearly a third of teachers believe performance-related pay system has not been introduced, poll finds

 

So the clear suggestion here is that schools have introduced PRP, but the teachers aren’t aware of it. 

That seems very strange – would something like this not be made absolutely clear?

How do you explain the results? 

 

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Comments

  1. GraemeTiffany

    SchoolsImprove Easy to presume ignorance, but may be subversion / resistance: deliberately disregarding evidence-free government policy.

  2. TimAnchorhouse

    SchoolsImprove RedHen90 Most schools rightly award pay increments to all teachers whose performance is satisfactory. That’s almost all.

  3. TimAnchorhouse

    SchoolsImprove RedHen90 Most schools rightly award pay increments to all teachers whose performance is satisfactory. That’s almost all.

  4. TimAnchorhouse

    SchoolsImprove RedHen90 So, except for maverick institutions, nothing has changed. At a time of teacher shortages, why is that strange?

  5. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove Schools can’t afford PRP; the entire policy is designed to save money by DfE not reward anyone other than the Treasury

  6. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove With budgets squeezed due to real terms cuts an “easy” saving is not awarding pay rises. It won’t through choice though

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