More than 50% of teachers in England ‘plan to quit in next two years’

The BBC is reporting a new survey suggesting more than half of teachers in England (53%) are thinking of quitting in the next two years.

The survey, conducted by the National Union of Teachers, found 61% of those wanting to leave blamed workload and 57% desired a better work/life balance.

Two thirds of the 1,020 primary and secondary school teachers questioned felt morale in the profession had declined over the past five years…

The survey, undertaken with a representative sample of teachers, also suggested many were unhappy with some of the government’s plans.

  • 76% said forcing schools that require improvement to become academies would damage education
  • 62% said the plans for 500 new free schools would also damage education
  • 54% were not confident the new baseline test for four-year-olds would provide valid information about a child’s ability

General secretary of the NUT, Christine Blower, said: “This survey demonstrates the combined, negative impact of the accountability agenda on teacher workload and morale. 

“Teachers feel that the Department for Education’s work thus far to tackle workload has been totally inadequate. 

“Meanwhile, nearly one million more pupils are coming into the system over the next decade. The government’s solution so far has been to build free schools, often where there are surplus places, and to allow class sizes to grow. 

“Add to this a situation where teachers are leaving in droves and teacher recruitment remains low. We now have a perfect storm of crisis upon crisis in the schools system…” 

More at: More than 50% of teachers in England ‘plan to quit in next two years’

 

These seem very worrying figures but as I have said many times on this site, surveys asking if things are worse now than before are not very reliable, especially when those taking the survey are aware of the bigger agenda behind the questions.

Much better would be a regular, repeating survey asking people how they feel now with the results compared from year to year.

Things don’t look great though do they?

 

Don’t forget you can sign up to receive our daily email bulletin every morning (around 7 am) with all the latest schools news stories. Your details will never be given to anyone else and you can unsubscribe at any stage. Just follow this link

Today's poll: Should truancy fines be deducted from benefits for parents who don’t pay?
Pay exam markers better to improve standards, says independent schools' chief
Categories: Teaching.

Comments

  1. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove In reality most of the people to say they want to leave will not be able to financially, but this is not positive news

  2. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove In reality most of the people to say they want to leave will not be able to financially, but this is not positive news

  3. ImSporticus

    SchoolsImprove Dont know anyone who wants to leave the profession, but many want to change schools in search for a more manageable workload

  4. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove More likely that many of those looking to “leave” will seek employment in private schools or other areas of education

  5. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove The continual neglect of retention in teaching by educationgovuk is a major issue; head-in-the-sand stuff

  6. ImSporticus

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove Yep. This is the main conversation I have with colleagues. False assumption that workload is easier there.

  7. Bedtonman

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove we’ve had the “workload challenge” for sometime now what has it achieved? Ah yes nothing

  8. Nicky4Kids

    I don’t want education to be a political football; I want education to be for our children and about our children.  A one-size-fits-all approach will not work – but it will be cheaper. My children are in primary and secondary community schools. For 5 days a week, teachers spend more time with my kids than I do – I value their role.

  9. Nicky4Kids

    I don’t want education to be a political football; I want education to be for our children and about our children.  A one-size-fits-all approach will not work – but it will be cheaper. My children are in primary and secondary community schools. For 5 days a week, teachers spend more time with my kids than I do – I value their role.

  10. mcallister1

    SchoolsImprove So annoying. Ridiculous stat and doesn’t help the situation. Who hasn’t ‘thought of leaving ‘ at a bad moment?

  11. Dai_James1942

    SchoolsImprove Not to mention the serried ranks of children responding to the worthlessness of the curriculum by mutiny.

  12. gavinboyd2012

    .SchoolsImprove To be replaced with cheap, unqualified staff. Big savings on pensions too. Govt policy ‘working’. educationgovuk

Let us know what you think...