Job cuts next year without more pay funding, heads warn

TES is reporting that schools could be forced to make job cuts to both teachers and teaching assistants because they are unable to afford next year’s teacher pay rise, a union has warned.

The Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL) has warned that an increase of 3 per cent in the total pay bill for teachers, and 2.5 per cent for senior leaders and headteachers (as set out in a Department for Education report published today), must be fully funded by the government.

ASCL is part of the School Cuts Coalition, which has pointed out that 16,500 schools will be “worse off” next year under government funding allocations.

The association says that about a quarter of schools will receive an inflation-only funding increase of 1.8 per cent, despite the government proposing an increase of 3 per cent in the total pay bill for teachers.

Read full article here Job cuts next year without more pay funding, heads warn

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Categories: DfE, Employment, Funding and Teaching.

Comments

  1. Judith Wilson

    Why pay ‘senior leaders and headteachers’ any more? Divert these funds to keep teaching assistants (who are far more effective and ‘hands on’ anyway) in employment.

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