Inclusion in mainstream school can exacerbate feelings of being ‘different’ in pupils with Autism Spectrum Conditions

Researchers from the University of Surrey have discovered that experiences of social and emotional exclusion in mainstream schools can adversely affect how pupils with autism view themselves, increasing their risk of developing low self-esteem, a poor sense of self-worth and mental health problems.

Examining 17 previous studies in the area, researchers discovered that how pupils with autism view themselves is closely linked to their perceptions of how other’s treat and interact with them. They found that a tendency of many pupils with the condition to internalise the negative attitudes and reactions of others toward them, combined with unfavourable social comparisons to classmates, leads to a sense of being ‘different’ and more limited than peers.  

It was discovered that the physical environment of schools can impact on children’s ability to interact with other pupils. Sensory sensitivity, which is a common characteristic of autism and can magnify sounds to an intolerable level, can lead to everyday classroom and playground noises such as shrieks and chatter being a source of anxiety and distraction. This impacts on a pupil’s ability to concentrate in the classroom and to socialise with others, further increasing isolation and a sense of being ‘different.’

It was also found pupils with autism who developed supportive friendships and felt accepted by classmates said this helped alleviate their social difficulties and made them feel good about themselves.

 Lead author of the paper Dr Emma Williams, from the University of Surrey, said: “We are not saying that mainstream schools are ‘bad’ for pupils with autism, as other evidence suggests they have a number of positive effects, including increasing academic performance and social skills.

“Rather, we are suggesting that by cultivating a culture of acceptance of all and making small changes, such as creating non-distracting places to socialise, and listening to their pupils’ needs, schools can help these pupils think and feel more positively about themselves.

“With over 100,000 children in the UK diagnosed with autism, it is important that we get this right to ensure that pupils with autism get the education they deserve and leave school feeling accepted, loved and valued, rather than with additional mental health issues”.

Read the full article Inclusion in mainstream school can exacerbate feelings of being ‘different’ in pupils with Autism Spectrum Conditions

Please tell us your thoughts in comments or via Twitter ~ Tamsin

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Comments

  1. Busy Mum

    Before we started ‘celebrating difference’, this country used to be very good at catering for the different by making specialist schools for them. This article probably holds the clue to the other article showing that parents of autistic children are home-schooling them – hardly surprising is it…..

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