Guest Post: How schools can save 90% in agency fees, and supply teachers can earn more

Last year, schools spent over £500m​ ​on supply teacher agency fees This staggering sum is made up of two main parts. First, commissions that average 30% for each supply  teacher booking; and second, the massive finder’s fees — sometimes up to £10,000 — that are levied on schools wishing to permanently employ supply teachers after a period of temporary work.

This is a sponsored guest post from Teacher Booker.

Moreover, the NUT reports that just 8% of supply teachers believe they are paid ‘national rates’, with 38% ‘not knowing’. These figures speak for themselves. Agencies insert themselves between schools and teachers, hide the commission they take from both sides and get fat on the margin.

Simply put, this diverts funds from their rightful destination — educating children — and into the coffers of behemoth agencies that explicitly operate On-Target-Earnings reward incentives for their employees. The behaviour this sort of compensation structure encourages is that of treating teachers as a commodity — ‘sell’ as many short term supply teachers as possible to a school, pay the teacher as little as they will accept (start negotiating low), and pocket the difference.  

Teachers have taken to the streets to protest this absurd and exploitative dynamic. A charter was published by the NUT , and the issue received national attention on ITV’s Good Morning Britain. But viable alternatives have been sadly lacking. Until now.

It’s time to #StandUpForSupply  

Traditional, established ways of doing things are being blown out of the water right, left and centre. The supercomputer in your hand is the key to a faster, cheaper and more efficient way of connecting people. And the change is happening right now — at Teacher Booker, we’re challenging the unfair model of traditional education recruitment and connecting supply teachers and schools directly. No middleman, no hidden fees, no fuss.  

This hands control back to both supply teachers and schools: Teachers set their own rate of pay and receive the full amount directly from the school. No umbrellas or agencies slicing and dicing their paycheck. They also set their own work preferences — no more 2 hour commutes to teach an unfamiliar age-group. For schools, all available teachers who match the criteria and experience required by the school for a particular day or cover period are viewable at the touch of a button. And the saving in agency fees is up to 90%.  

It’s beyond time to make education recruitment better and fairer.  Sign up now at www.teacherbooker.com , or email [email protected]  for more information. Also on Twitter @teacherbooker

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Categories: Budgets, Guest Post, Primary, Secondary, and Teaching.

Comments

  1. Parent Governor

    Schools then just need to some additional widget to work out exactly what the cost is in terms of Uber-style worker entitlements for any supply teachers booked. Also, watch out for the revamped off-payroll worker rules.

  2. How do teachers working with teacher booker get past the IR35 rule? In my experience, schools don’t want the supply teacher to be an employee of the school as their hours are too varied and too flexible, and they want to use agencies to supply and pay staff!

  3. SM01

    Teacherbooker only registered as a company in January 2017. How will they supply enough teachers to have an impact compared to the 500+ agencies supplying 40000+ teachers every day? this isn’t a guest post – it’s an advert for someone who wants a slice of the £500m as they state above or are they doing this free of charge?

  4. Samina Randall

    Am I right in thinking that this model requires the supply teacher to be self employed & on a zero hour contract? The school won’t want to employ the supply teacher for casual work.

Let us know what you think...