Grammar plans ‘absolutely not’ a return to the 11-plus, says Justine Greening

The TES is reporting Justine Greening’s comments that the government’s plans to expand the number of grammar schools will “absolutely not” be a return to the 11-plus entrance exams.

The education secretary also refused to be drawn on how many of the selective schools would be created, stating it would be decided locally.

Her appearance on ITV’s Peston on Sunday comes just days after prime minister Theresa May vowed to establish the first grammar school in 50 years at the Conservative Party conference in Birmingham on Wednesday.

Ms Greening repeated the government’s claims that there would be no return to the “binary system” of grammar schools and secondary moderns in the 1950s.

“This is absolutely not about a return to the 11-plus, and one of the areas we are consulting on is whether children should be able to go into selective schools at different ages, rather than just at age 11.

“We have to understand that children develop at different paces and our education system needs to reflect that.”

More at: Grammar plans ‘absolutely not’ a return to the 11-plus, says Justine Greening

Let us know your thoughts on Justine Greening’s comments ~ Jon

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Comments

  1. “one of the areas we are consulting on is whether children should be able to go into selective schools at different ages, rather than just at age 11.”
    Good idea!  It’s called a ‘Comprehensive School’ – all the pupils go there and, if you develop academic skills later, you get moved up a set/stream in some subjects.
    “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

  2. So how exactly will the children be chosen if not by a test at 11?   Teacher recommendation, perhaps?   I can see how that might be abused.  Sticking a pin in a list of names?   Would find the high ability pupils that are supposed to be channelled into the ‘centres of excellence’.
    And as for moving pupils at different ages, it’s unlikely grammars would leave empty spaces ready for late developers.  This would mean grammars would have to eject previously-selected pupils who hadn’t kept up.  These rejects would then have to take places vacated by late developers.

  3. Nairb1

    Surely this can’t be an example of announcing a policy, getting the headlines, and then realising that some detail would have been helpful when deciding the policy. Most unlike the government to make that mistake. Again. And again. And again.

  4. gov2

    Janet2  “grammars would have to eject previously-selected pupils who hadn’t kept up”  And that would so please the snotty middle class voters that the fanatic advising Theresa presumably expected to please.

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