Give teachers ‘more money and free time’ for working in tough schools

The TES is reporting new research that suggests teachers believe offering more money and more time out of the classroom are the best ways to encourage the best staff to work in schools in disadvantaged areas.

From a sample of 1,430 teachers, 35 per cent thought that increased pay or bonuses could encourage more teachers to teach in challenging schools, while 33 per cent said more free periods.

Teachers also thought that teachers should receive financial rewards for improving their pupils’ results, with nearly two-thirds supporting additional cash, according to the National Foundation for Education Research (NFER) poll carried out for the Sutton Trust mobility charity…

The findings were released today, as a separate study revealed that more experienced teachers were “more effective” than those in the first few years of their careers. But they were more likely to work in less disadvantaged schools.

The study, from the University of Cambridge – also for the Sutton Trust – found that teachers in the most advantaged fifth of schools in England have an average of nearly one-and-a-half years more experience than those in the least advantaged.

The findings – based on responses from 2,500 teachers in England – also revealed that teachers in the most disadvantaged schools were more likely to be teaching multiple subjects…

More at: Give teachers ‘more money and free time’ for working in tough schools

 

These research studies are being released as part of the Sutton Trust “The Best in Class” event on improving social mobility in schools. See more about the findings from the Sutton Trust at: Best in Class Summit

 

So we seem to have a situation where our more experienced and effective teachers are more likely to be found in our more advantaged schools which, you could argue, is the opposite of what we might want (at least in terms of boosting social mobility).

The suggestion is that pay and benefits are the best levers to change the situation. Would you agree? And does this mean the profession needs to embrace the idea of teacher pay being related to the scale of the challenge any particular job brings based, in part, of the nature and location of the school involved?

Please let us know why/why not in the comments or via Twitter…

 

Should teacher pay reflect the challenges faced by individual schools?

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Comments

  1. TW

    “Teachers also thought that teachers should receive financial rewards for improving their pupils’ results, with nearly two-thirds supporting additional cash”

    What do they think about getting less pay if they have the class with all the difficult problem children?

  2. @TW Exactly.  If I’d been paid according to the results in GCSE English and English Literature of my mainly Set 4 pupils (mostly boys), I would never have received a pay rise.  It would be wrong to describe all of them as ‘difficult problem children’ – I’d rather say most were loveable rogues.  But rogues they were – avoiding work if at all possible; flexible attitude to attendance and deadlines; never quite grasping the point of punctuation or legible writing.

  3. Experienced teachers are more expensive – easiest way for governing bodies to balance the books is to make them redundant.  Yet these are the very teachers that are needed for the most difficult-to-teach pupils.

  4. cia262

    SchoolsImprove Working in a disadvantaged area has a limited shelf-life. There are better options for teachers.

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