Education Fellowship Trust becomes first academy chain to give up all of its schools

The Tes reports that a Multi-academy trust has been rocked by concerns over education standards, finance and governance.

An academy trust with 12 schools has become the first in England to give up control of all its academies, following concerns about educational standards.

Five of the schools sponsored by the Education Fellowship Trust (TEFT) – which is responsible for the education of about 6,500 students in Northamptonshire, Wiltshire and Maidenhead, Berkshire – are rated “inadequate” by Ofsted.

An academy trust with 12 schools has become the first in England to give up control of all its academies, following concerns about educational standards.

Lizzie Rowe, chief operating office of TEFT, said it “has requested to transfer all of its 12 academies to new sponsors following a review of financial constraints facing the education sector and the misalignment of values with the DfE”.

She added: “TEFT’s priority at this time is to ensure a smooth and timely transfer that minimises impact on the pupils, staff, parents and local communities at the schools.”

The trust, which was originally known as the Education Schools Trust, has twice been under a financial notice to improve, the most recent of which was issued last September.

More at Education Fellowship Trust becomes first academy chain to give up all of its schools

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Comments

  1. It may be the first to get rid of all of its schools but others have handed schools around like pieces of second hand furniture. In this case it looks as though some have paid themselves extraordinarily well before doing so. This is more evidence that academies, ‘free’ schools, UTCs, etc do not provide the necessary stability in education but are leeching huge amounts of money out of the system, often into private pockets. Any school considering becoming a standalone academy should be warned. Once an academy, you cannot guarantee who will be running the school in the future.

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