Don’t penalise us for helping struggling schools, heads tell Ofsted

The TES is reporting that headteachers say they are being “penalised” by Ofsted for doing what the government wants and helping to turn around struggling schools…

Chief inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw and Prime Minister David Cameron have called on the best school leaders to improve more than one school and share their expertise where it is needed most.

But Ofsted’s official policy is not to take this work into account when grading the quality of leadership during school inspections…

Clive Mathew, headteacher of John Henry Newman Catholic School in Stevenage, has worked with his leadership team to secure improvements in his own school and pull another secondary out of special measures within in a year.

But despite this “crippling” effort, his school’s leadership grade dropped in its last Ofsted report. “Why would anybody work with another school?” he said.

For the full storyget the 27 March edition of TES

More at: Don’t penalise us for helping struggling schools, heads tell Ofsted

 

So this seems very unfair and counterproductive if we want to encourage collaboration between schools. What do you think?

I guess the complication is that the Ofsted report is focussed, ultiumately, on the specific school and might be misleading if it grades on the impact leadership is having on a different school.

Any thoughts on how to get round this? Please share in the comments or via Twitter…

 

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Comments

  1. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove This is typical, unjoined up thinking by govt and its agencies. Highlights the inadequacy of the system as a whole

  2. Schools are in a double-bind.  They’re supposed to support weaker schools in order to accrue Ofsted points but if their efforts mean less attention is paid to the stronger school then Ofsted downgrades its  leadership and management.

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