Deaf children fall further behind classmates at A-level due to government cuts, analysis finds

The Independent deaf children are falling further behind their hearing classmates at A-level amid government funding cuts, an analysis has found.

Almost six in 10 (58.8 per cent) deaf pupils in England failed to achieve more than one A-level by the age of 19 last year, the highest proportion since 2012, the latest figures show.

Students with no special educational needs (SEN) opened up the biggest attainment gap – 23.5 percentage points – over their deaf peers for six years, the analysis of government data has revealed.

Only 41.2 per cent of deaf pupils achieved two A-levels, or equivalent technical qualifications, by the age of 19 in 2017, compared with 64.7 per cent of their hearing classmates.

The National Deaf Children’s Society (NDCS), which carried out the analysis, has said the decline in attainment among deaf young people has been driven by “year on year cuts”.

And the attainment gap is likely to get worse this year, the charity said.

The warning comes after thousands of students picked up their A-level results and found out whether they attained their university places, and pupils will receive their GCSE grades on Thursday.

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