Deaf children fall behind at school, says charity

BBC is reporting that deaf children in England are falling behind their classmates from primary school through to GCSE, analysis by the National Deaf Children’s Society shows.

Only 30.6% achieve a GCSE strong pass – Grade 5 or above – in both English and maths, compared with 48.3% of children with no special educational needs.

The NCDS urges more government funding.

Ann Jillings, from Lowestoft, in Suffolk, says the only reason her 12-year-old deaf son, Daniel, is not falling behind at school is because the family has fought hard for additional support.

“Sometimes I’ve been quite dogged in making sure that Daniel’s [education, health and care] plan reflected what he needed – it takes a certain amount of stubbornness and perseverance to navigate the system,” she says.

A spokeswoman for the Department for Education said: “Our ambition for children with special educational needs and disabilities, including those who are deaf, is exactly the same for every other child – to achieve well in education, and go on to live happy and fulfilled lives.

“We recognise that local authorities are facing cost pressures on high needs and that there is more to do which is why in December 2018 we announced an additional £250m in funding for high needs over this and next year.”

Read more Deaf children fall behind at school, says charity

Do you agree that more government funding is needed to help support these children? Please tell us your thoughts in comments or via Twitter ~ Emma

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