Deaf boy, 12, fights for his right to take GCSE in sign language and is set to sue government for discrimination

Daniel Jillings and his mother Ann want British Sign Language to be taught in schools and say the Government’s refusal to offer an exam is ‘discriminatory and unlawful’. The Daily Mail reports.

Pupils aged 11 to 14 are obliged to learn a foreign language but Daniel, who goes to Bungay High School, Suffolk, cannot study one at GCSE as he cannot complete a listening and speaking test.

Mrs Jillings, of Lowestoft, said it was ‘denying deaf children the same opportunities as other school pupils’. The Department for Education said talks about a signing exam were already under way.

A spokesman added: ‘We are not opposed to the introduction of a British Sign Language GCSE.’ BSL is recognised as a language and used by about 70,000 Britons.” 

Previously the government agreed to consider a sign language GCSE but say that there is no plans to do it in the next four years.

This means Daniel, who attends Bungay High School in Suffolk, and other deaf children of a similar age will miss a chance to gain a qualification in their first language.

Modern foreign languages are compulsory in key stage three and four – between the ages of 11 and 14. Most schools offer French, German and Spanish.

Read more Deaf boy, 12, fights for his right to take GCSE in sign language and is set to sue government for discrimination

Please tell us your thoughts in comments or via Twitter ~ Tamsin

Don’t forget you can sign up to receive our daily email bulletin (around 7am) with all the latest schools news stories. Your details will never be given to anyone else and you can unsubscribe at any stage. Just follow this link 

We now have a Facebook page - pls click to like!

 

More recent posts...

0-the-school-leadership-journey

Children who can't catch lag behind in reading, writing and maths, study claims
Government has not learnt from academy failures that damaged children’s education, MPs say
Categories: Exams, Learning, Secondary, and SEN.

Let us know what you think...