Compulsory Ebac will cause ‘substantial problems’ for schools, say heads

The TES is reporting warnings from head teachers that plans for all students to study Ebac subjects at GCSE will result in schools facing “substantial problems..”

..After winning the election, prime minister David Cameron stated that his government would implement the Conservative party’s manifesto in full. This includes the pledge that all GCSE pupils will be required to study EBac subjects: English, maths, a science, a humanity and a modern foreign language.

Headteachers are concerned that this will limit the subjects their students can take in order to meet the government’s new league table measure, Progress 8, which will replace the five A*-C benchmark…

David Blow, headteacher of the Ashcombe School in Surrey, said the move was likely to cause “very substantial problems” for his students, who would want a greater focus on more creative subjects…

For the full story, get the 29 May edition of TES 

More at: Compulsory Ebac will cause ‘substantial problems’ for schools, say heads

 

Under the Progress 8 plans, results will be tracked in eight subjects split into three groups: one for English and maths (with double weighting), then one for three Ebac subjects, and then one for three optional subjects.

However, the Ebac requirement for all will presumably, in effect, restrict this second group not just to any three Ebac subjects but instead specifically to a science, a humanity and a modern language, potentially limiting further the options in the third group. Is that right?

Where do you see the problems emerging from this in practice and in which kind of scenarios will it have the greatest impact?

 

Requiring all GCSE students to take a science, humanity and language for the Ebac - good move?

 

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Comments

  1. JoNoGo

    SchoolsImprove EBacc-courses offered should be broad & balanced & appropriate to interests/ability of child. Crazy to insist ‘compulsory’.

  2. JoNoGo

    SchoolsImprove EBacc- the difficulties for progress8 is a side issue. What is right for the student? Not compulsory EBacc for all.

  3. waterside09

    MadgeJesss SchoolsImprove our experience of MFL teaching is generally poor with too few staff & too much inflexibility exp.4 gifted child

  4. MadgeJesss

    waterside09 SchoolsImprove Need to use aural/oral + technology rather than teacher-taught and written? We have the technology.

  5. MadgeJesss

    waterside09 SchoolsImprove Need to use aural/oral + technology rather than teacher-taught and written? We have the technology.

  6. MadgeJesss

    waterside09 SchoolsImprove Need to use aural/oral + technology rather than teacher-taught and written? We have the technology.

  7. Nothing wrong with studying these subjects as part of a broad, balanced curriculum to 16.  But there’s no need for them to be examined – other countries don’t do this.  England is increasingly out-of-step.

  8. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove The HTs are absolutely right; this is typical of the “one size fits all” attitude of politicians and will be harmful to many

  9. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove The “progress” bit of Progress 8 is better/fairer than the “C or above” measure but it’s the “8” bit that’s the issue

  10. waterside09

    MadgeJesss SchoolsImprove we need a wider range of teaching methods that embrace & celebrate MFL – without we fail children

  11. egaliteacher

    SchoolsImprove reasoning a shame as universities have spoken against narrow EBacc (Universities UK report to education select committee)

  12. egaliteacher

    SchoolsImprove reasoning a sham as universities have spoken against narrow EBacc (Universities UK report to education select committee)

Let us know what you think...