Children as young as 4 expelled from school as bad behaviour soars

The Mirror is reporting that thirty pupils aged four and under were permanently banned from schools over behaviour issues in just 12 months.

They were among tens of ­ ­thousands of primary and nursery children excluded for a host of offences including assault, racism and sexual misconduct, statistics reveal…

Unions blame the axing of early intervention support systems that help identify problems in ­youngsters before they get out of hand.

Lib Dem leader Tim Farron branded the crisis “a national scandal”. He said: “Teaching is facing a recruitment crisis and violence in the classroom is part of the reason why.

“We need to tackle the root causes of this crisis earlier on and prevent problem behaviour developing.” NASUWT union general secretary Chris Keates added: “It is disturbing that so many young children are exhibiting violence.

“Unfortunately, the services schools used to be able to access for early intervention when pupils first show signs of unacceptable ­behaviour have either reduced or been axed as a result of cuts to local authority budgets. It is ­essential given the age of these pupils that high quality support is made available…

The appalling numbers were ­uncovered by the Lib Dems. They were contained in the Department for Education’s Permanent and ­Fixed-term Exclusions Report for 2013-14, the most recent available. The figure of 870 permanently excluded pupils represents a leap of 30% from 610 only three years ago.

Of those, 240 were excluded for attacking adults and 150 for assaulting classmates. Another 130 were kicked out for using ­threatening behaviour against teachers or other pupils, while 280 were barred for “persistent disruptive behaviour”. Seventy children in nursery were suspended for a fixed period, as were 1,970 in reception class. More than 45,000 primary age pupils got ­suspensions…

More at: Children as young as 4 expelled from school as bad behaviour soars

 

There are more figures in the full article although nothing yet on the Lib Dem website or social media feeds.

What do you make of the figures, the apparently escalating scale of the problem and the suggestion that it is the result of cuts to early intervention services?

Can you give me details, based on your own experiences, of exactly what has changed and what impact it has had?

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Categories: Parenting, Policy, Pre-school and Primary.

Comments

  1. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove Not easy to permanently exclude anyone from school so presumably they “deserved” it; students have to go somewhere though

  2. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove All exclusion does is move the issue rather than deal with it, however there need to be consequences for certain actions

  3. ballater6

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove IMO prim sch perm exclude as last resort-must be really serious-amazing how much ‘help’ once excl is mentioned

  4. ballater6

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove IMO prim sch perm exclude as last resort-must be really serious-amazing how much ‘help’ once excl is mentioned

  5. ballater6

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove IMO prim sch perm exclude as last resort-must be really serious-amazing how much ‘help’ once excl is mentioned

  6. ballater6

    andylutwyche SchoolsImprove IMO prim sch perm exclude as last resort-must be really serious-amazing how much ‘help’ once excl is mentioned

  7. andylutwyche

    ballater6 SchoolsImprove I totally agree: last resort. The implication is that the actions were that serious though

  8. andylutwyche

    ballater6 SchoolsImprove I totally agree: last resort. The implication is that the actions were that serious though

  9. andylutwyche

    ballater6 SchoolsImprove I totally agree: last resort. The implication is that the actions were that serious though

  10. andylutwyche

    ballater6 SchoolsImprove I totally agree: last resort. The implication is that the actions were that serious though

  11. andylutwyche

    ballater6 SchoolsImprove Absolutely – it’s tough & a symptom of political rhetoric of “parents aren’t capable” that’s now bearing fruit

  12. andylutwyche

    ballater6 SchoolsImprove Absolutely – it’s tough & a symptom of political rhetoric of “parents aren’t capable” that’s now bearing fruit

  13. andylutwyche

    ballater6 SchoolsImprove Absolutely – it’s tough & a symptom of political rhetoric of “parents aren’t capable” that’s now bearing fruit

  14. andylutwyche

    ballater6 SchoolsImprove Absolutely – it’s tough & a symptom of political rhetoric of “parents aren’t capable” that’s now bearing fruit

  15. teresaholm1

    SchoolsImprove not surprised filling there heads with sexed now they are not sure what gender .never had this years ago.

  16. wasateacher

    teresaholm1 SchoolsImprove Schools do not fill childrens’ heads with sex.  The problem is that the regime of testing imposed by the Government doesn’t allow children to develop the social skills through play.  That combined with the worsening home lives of so many because of poor housing and lack of money will inevitably lead to more disruption.

  17. wasateacher

    Schools are now almost forced to compete with each other, particularly on the basis of test results and particularly in primary schools.  This has led to many schools focussing so much more on the formal tests rather than developing the whole child.  Sadly this will come back to bite us even more seriously in 10/15 years time.

    Schools need to work together to solve problems but, as local authorities are weakened and marginalised in education, there will be less and less support for such cooperation and less and less support for individual children.

    In my area the places outside schools which could help children to develop as children (adventure playgrounds, youth clubs, mother and toddler……) have all been cut completely or reduced.  Children from high rise, crime ridden blocks and poverty have nowhere outside of school to let off steam and learn to play – so it happens in schools.

  18. hilarywilce

    Rhythm4Reading JanTallis SHSorguk Agree. But are there broader societal changes going on we need to look at more thoroughly?

  19. Rhythm4Reading

    hilarywilce JanTallis SHSorguk obviously – austerity maybe only one such factor but generalisations aren’t necessarily helpful

  20. typograph

    SchoolsImprove knock on effect of changes to educational psychologist route (no conversion degree) resulting in lack of support services

  21. GeoffJames42

    MikeArmiger there is the strengths-based alternative of solution-focused support – my book ‘Transforming behaviour in the classroom’ sage

  22. MikeArmiger

    GeoffJames42 sage there is definately that option. Also advocate assisted regulation communication and pacification for victims of trauma

  23. SirAlsDad

    MikeArmiger EmmaKennedy123 On the contrary, exclusion works to the vast majority. It might not work for the excluded, but oh well.

  24. EmmaKennedy123

    SirAlsDad MikeArmiger what pathetic excuse of a professional working in education excludes our most Vulnerable kids?

  25. SirAlsDad

    EmmaKennedy123 MikeArmiger ‘Vulnerable’ is a very handy excuse for ruining the life chances of the majority.

  26. EmmaKennedy123

    SirAlsDad MikeArmiger no. Vulnerable are the kids from abusive homes. School is their place of safety and value. Look after them.

  27. MikeArmiger

    EmmaKennedy123 SirAlsDad firstly the point of a consequence is to change behaviour. For many of these kids rejection is all they’ve known

  28. SirAlsDad

    EmmaKennedy123 MikeArmiger If that’s genuinely what they are then yes. But not to the detriment of others.

  29. MikeArmiger

    EmmaKennedy123 SirAlsDad so exclusion is feeding the existing problem. 2ndly if punitive consequences worked our prisons wouldn’t be full

  30. SirAlsDad

    MikeArmiger EmmaKennedy123 First point of an intervention should be to protect the others in the class.

  31. MikeArmiger

    EmmaKennedy123 SirAlsDad 3rdly if we exclude without other provision we are passing the buck without meeting child’s need. Zero evidence

  32. MikeArmiger

    EmmaKennedy123 SirAlsDad exists for exclusion working successfully for many kids. They fall out of education & are condemned to scrapheap

  33. MikeArmiger

    SirAlsDad EmmaKennedy123 vulnerable could mean a mental health need. So we exclude them for having a medical condition? That’s illegal

  34. SirAlsDad

    EmmaKennedy123 MikeArmiger I’m so glad I’ve been able to help you feel good about yourself today. Carry on ruining the majority.

  35. MikeArmiger

    jordyjax SchoolsImprove I know I was thinking that too. I saw data the other weeks from two MAT’S that made my blood boil

  36. EmmaKennedy123

    SirAlsDad MikeArmiger I don’t feel good about having to stand up for vulnerable children. We shouldn’t have to.

  37. jordyjax

    SirAlsDad MikeArmiger EmmaKennedy123 are you suggesting it doesn’t matter?? Sorry…are you really a teacher? Ah…independent schl

  38. jordyjax

    EmmaKennedy123 SirAlsDad MikeArmiger well your majority are fee paying so you don’t need to worry about our vulnerable kids :((

  39. SL51TOR

    SirAlsDad MikeArmiger EmmaKennedy123 I have autistic son who was excluded. no threat to class. Threat to the school’s results.

  40. SL51TOR

    SirAlsDad MikeArmiger EmmaKennedy123 as a teacher it really concerns me that a teacher can consider exclusion a good move

  41. EmmaKennedy123

    MikeArmiger SL51TOR SirAlsDad One thing worth adding to this conversation is that child abuse does exist in middle class homes too. (1/2)

  42. EmmaKennedy123

    MikeArmiger SL51TOR SirAlsDad In independent schools there r vulnerable children.No teacher should have the attitude that exclusion is ok

  43. EmmaKennedy123

    MikeArmiger SL51TOR SirAlsDad we focus on economic factors when it comes to disadvantage in ed.The most disadvantaged are the abused.

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