Brian Lightman: Deal with funding and recruitment before you move on to so-called “coasting” schools

Writing in the TES, ASCL general secretary Brian Lightman says we must not mistake political hyperbole for a real crisis in English education around funding and teacher recruitment. This is an extract…

…The other major issue facing schools, and one that may ultimately undermine all the good intentions in the world, is that of funding.

The Institute for Fiscal Studies calculates that schools and colleges face rising costs of up to 12 per cent over the next five years because of increases in wages, pension contributions and inflation…

The solution to both further raising standards and addressing problems including recruitment and funding is for the teaching profession and the government to work together constructively with the shared moral purpose of ensuring a world-class education for every child.

So, to quote David Cameron’s overture to the Liberal Democrats in the last parliament, we would like to make this Government a “big, open and comprehensive offer” to engage with us in a new discourse about the future of our education system.

It is our belief and ambition that together we can build a system in which all schools can succeed and all children can achieve…

More at: ‘Deal with funding and recruitment before you move on to so-called “coasting” schools’

 

We do seem to be getting a consensus that funding – along with recruitment – are the two most pressing issues facing schools.

What, however, do you make of Brian Lightman’s comments about the government and teaching profession working together, constructively, for the education system. 

Is this just rhetoric or do you see any meaningful substance behind this? What would it mean in reality?

Please let us know what you think in the comments or via Twitter…

 

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Categories: Policy.

Comments

  1. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove Political focus on threats to public services is designed to take attention away from lack of funding/organisation from them

  2. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove Political focus on threats to public services is designed to take attention away from lack of funding/organisation from them

  3. Nicky Morgan says she wants to work with the profession as an alternative to the confrontational approach taken by Gove who only praised those teachers who agreed with his policies or those schools who did what he wanted.
    But despite the soothing words, Morgan is no different.  She told Andrew Marr she thought academies were better than non-academies.  She told the Schools Week webinar (Monday) any school judged Inadequate would be fast-tracked to academy conversion (despite the evidence this expensive intervention was no magic bullet).  No exceptions.  She would close ‘loopholes’ which allowed parents and others to oppose academy conversion.  Like her predecessor, she cited Downhills.  That opposition must have riled Gove et al, because it inevitably features in pro-academy puff as an example of a school which improved when a sponsor took it over.  But it was actually improving BEFORE conversion and was ripe, therefore, for takeover by a sponsor who could claim further improvement was down to them.

    She’s the equivalent of Nero fiddling while Rome burns. http://www.localschoolsnetwork.org.uk/2015/05/will-nicky-morgan-fiddle-while-rome-burns/

  4. VictoriaJaquiss

    SchoolsImprove Talk of coasting schools is just another distraction. To support our kids we need as many qualified adults as poss.

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