Benefits of free nursery education ‘not lasting’

The BBC is reporting a study that suggests free part-time pre-school education in England has not led to lasting educational benefits…

The greatest impact, it indicates, was on the poorest children, whose early education foundation stage profile (FSP) scores were boosted by 15 points.

Children’s FSP scores overall were boosted by 2% to 89.3, but this impact had declined by age seven and 11.

And for every six children given a free place by the scheme, only one had started nursery because of it.

The study, by the University of Surrey, University of Essex and the Institute of Education, focused on the free early education entitlement between 2002 and 2007.

On average, it indicated, free nursery places had had a small beneficial impact at age five, but the size of this effect had declined by age seven and disappeared by age 11.

However, the research also suggested children who had taken up a nursery place just because it had been free – the poorest children – had seen significant improvements to their FSP at age five.

The FSP is a set of measures of a child’s early education ability and covers areas such as communication, understanding of early reading and number work.

But this did not close the gap in attainment between rich and poor children in the longer term, the researchers say.

“While previous research has suggested that early education is key to long-term attainment, our research has shown that the free entitlement did not deliver the anticipated gains,” said Dr Jo Blanden, senior lecturer in economics at the University of Surrey.

“On the face of it, our results cast some doubt over the value for money of universal early education.”

Dr Blanden said more than 80% of the children taking up free places would probably have gone to nursery anyway, adding that there had been no educational benefits in the longer term…

Neil Leitch, chief executive of the Pre-school Learning Alliance, said the findings suggested the introduction of free early-education places had had a limited impact on outcomes, because most children accessing places would have done so anyway, even if the places had not been free.

But he added: “This is not the same as saying that early education itself has a limited impact, and should not be misinterpreted as such.”…

More at: Benefits of free nursery education ‘not lasting’

 

See also: Why free childcare is not helping many mums back to work

 

So we appear to be learning today that free part-time childcare is neither leading to lasting education benefits or helping many mothers back into work, so is it time to rethink? Your reactions? Please share in the comments or via Twitter…

 

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Categories: Parenting, Policy and Pre-school.

Comments

  1. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove Rather proves the point that if nursery places are provided for free few extra people actually take them up. Political guff

  2. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove Rather proves the point that if nursery places are provided for free few extra people actually take them up. Political guff

  3. colinsparkbridg

    hpmcveigh SchoolsImprove But free nursery education can be good in its own right for young children, irrespective of long-term effects

  4. colinsparkbridg

    hpmcveigh SchoolsImprove But free nursery education can be good in its own right for young children, irrespective of long-term effects

  5. kennygfrederick

    SchoolsImprove -but negative aspects of intense poverty in our country are long lasting! That’s what we need to sort out not tinker!

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