Academies: patchy results and scandal ‘inevitable’, warns former Ofsted chair

The TES is reporting that the former chair of Ofsted has warned education in England is suffering the consequences of a “rushed revolution”, with academies suffering from patchy results and mismanagement…

Speaking to the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference (HMC) today, Baroness Sally Morgan, who left her Ofsted job this month, said the government’s attachment to the market had led to an “aversion to anything that smacks of national strategy”.

She particularly criticised the academies programme, saying that quality control had been “poor” and there were no incentives for strong-performing schools to help weaker ones.

“Patchy results, mismanagement and occasional scandal have been the inevitable result” she told delegates at the HMC’s annual conference at the Celtic Manor Resort in Newport, South Wales.

The “perceived obsession” with free schools had also not helped, she said.

“In the rush to disrupt the prevailing order, unsuitable groups were allowed to open schools and the Department [for Education] now has to deal with the consequences,” she added.

Baroness Morgan said that if there was to be a market in education it had to be managed. “A national education policy demands a national, thought-out, joined-up strategy.”

…But despite criticising several government policies in her speech to the HMC conference today, Baroness Morgan refrained from attacking Mr Gove directly.

She said he was clear from the start that he was determined to reform schooling so poor children had a fair chance of getting a great education.

“It’s undeniable that he changed the face of English education in a remarkably short space of time, probably more drastically than any minister in recent history apart from Kenneth Baker and Andrew Adonis,” she added…

More at: Academies: patchy results and scandal ‘inevitable’, warns former Ofsted chair

 

How do you react to these comments from Baroness Morgan on the academies and free school programmes? Fair comment or something that has to be filtered through her own political allegiances? Please give us your feedback in the comments or via Twitter…

 

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Comments

  1. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove Why didn’t Baroness Morgan do this whilst Chair of Ofsted (it suggests she’s left)? Politicians are pointless individuals

  2. andylutwyche

    SchoolsImprove Why didn’t Baroness Morgan do this whilst Chair of Ofsted (it suggests she’s left)? Politicians are pointless individuals

  3. “…(Gove) changed the face of English education in a remarkably short space of time, probably more drastically than any minister in recent history apart from Kenneth Baker and Andrew Adonis,”
    This is the problem:  we have had 3 transforming ministers during the career of a teacher. It is not the specific ‘reform’ imposed by any one Sec. of State for Education, but the fact that the 1988 Act gave them the power.  Until this power is removed and given to an independent body, the next Sec. of State will simply impose their own ‘reforms’.

  4. Janet2

    Finland’s education system, now one of the world’s best-performing, was reformed slowly and carefully over a long period of time.  The reform was based on consensus and was NOT the result of high-profile intervention by governments or individuals.

    http://www.oecd.org/pisa/pisaproducts/46581035.pdf

    Yet too many school ministers (Baker, Adonis and Gove) have tried to impose their view of education ‘reform’ on to schools: national curriculum, league tables, gov’t approved methodology; arbitrarily imposed benchmarks and marketisation.

  5. Janet2

    Finland’s education system, now one of the world’s best-performing, was reformed slowly and carefully over a long period of time.  The reform was based on consensus and was NOT the result of high-profile intervention by governments or individuals.

    http://www.oecd.org/pisa/pisaproducts/46581035.pdf

    Yet too many school ministers (Baker, Adonis and Gove) have tried to impose their view of education ‘reform’ on to schools: national curriculum, league tables, gov’t approved methodology; arbitrarily imposed benchmarks and marketisation.

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