11% of 15-18s encouraged to take up an apprenticeship

According to FE Week, one in ten 15 to 18-year-olds are being encouraged to take up an apprenticeship by their schoolteachers, a new YouGov survey has revealed.

It found that 73 per cent of students reported that the most likely recommendation from their school or sixth form would be to follow a university route.

Association of Employment and Learning Providers chief executive Mark Dawe said that considering that the Baker Clause – a legal requirement for schools to promote apprenticeships and other skills programmes – has been in force since 2018, this report “makes depressing reading”.

The results of the YouGov survey also indicated that just ten per cent of 15 to 18-year olds are “very content” with the amount of technical job support or practical skills, such as engineering or plumbing, they receive in lessons.

Read full article here 11% of 15-18s encouraged to take up an apprenticeship

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Categories: Apprenticeships, Data, DfE, Further Education, Learning, Opportunities, Technology and University.

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