10 teachers resign from ‘troubled’ primary school

The Leicester Mercury is reporting that ten teachers have resigned from a local primary school and will leave at Christmas.

Uplands Junior School, in Highfields, has been in special measures since January last year.

At the end of May, Secretary of State for Education Nicky Morgan ordered that the school become an academy.

She replaced the interim executive board (IEB) – appointed by Leicester City Council to turn the school’s fortunes around – with one of her own choosing.

The school is now in the process of converting into an academy sponsored by the L.E.A.D. Academy Trust, based in Nottingham.

Staff are also in dispute with the school’s newly appointed IEB over excessive monitoring and observations taking place.

Ian Leaver, assistant secretary for Leicester’s National Union of Teachers (NUT) has written to interim head Moira Hunt to try to resolve the situation.

He said: “For ten teachers to resign, the majority with no job to go to, is unprecedented and reflects the frustration and anger at the way they have been treated by members of the new IEB.

“They are deeply concerned about the impact of this on students, but don’t believe that the current IEB has any plan, other than forcing the school to become an academy, to help support the improvements that staff were working on through the school year 2014-15…”

Ofsted inspectors last visited the school on June 17 and 18 and found it was still not making enough progress…

More at: Uplands Junior School – 10 teachers resign

 

This doesn’t sound good but if the school is in special measures and deemed still not to be making enough progress presumably things do need to be changed?

Any local insights or thoughts on what seems to be going on here?

 

Don’t forget you can sign up to receive our daily email bulletin every morning (around 7 am) with all the latest schools news stories. Your details will never be given to anyone else and you can unsubscribe at any stage. Just follow this link

Fifth FE college given foundation degree awarding powers as moratorium ends
Teacher's rant at workload pressures goes viral
Categories: Academies, Primary and Teaching.

Comments

  1. The school was put in special measures in Jan 2014.  The LA had noticed a decline in performance at the school and had already established an Interim Executive Board which was to meet for the first time when Ofsted arrived (Jan 2014).  There had been a ‘strained relationship’ between the school and the LA at the time.
    Ofsted’s first monitoring visit (May 2014) found neither the school’s action plan nor the LA’s plan were fit for purpose.  However, the next two monitoring visits (September 2014 and January 2015) judged the school was making ‘reasonable progress’ towards the removal of special measures.  Inspectors said teaching standards were rising and the LA was working effectively with the school.  The new interim head had ‘established positive relations with all members of the school community.’
    It was after this, when the school was showing signs of improvement, that Morgan intervened and imposed her own IEB.  When Ofsted arrived again for monitoring in June shortly after the new IEB had taken over, inspectors said the school was now NOT making enough progress to get out of special measures.  Although most of the staff were working hard a small number were anxious about changes  Staff morale was not good, inspectors said.
    The LA had already said it was exploring academy conversion so it wasn’t necessary for Morgan to impose this ‘solution’.  This raises the question why it was necessary for Morgan to intervene and about how far her intervention caused the improvement to be reversed.

  2. The school was put in special measures in Jan 2014.  The LA had noticed a decline in performance at the school and had already established an Interim Executive Board which was to meet for the first time when Ofsted arrived (Jan 2014).  There had been a ‘strained relationship’ between the school and the LA at the time.
    Ofsted’s first monitoring visit (May 2014) found neither the school’s action plan nor the LA’s plan were fit for purpose.  However, the next two monitoring visits (September 2014 and January 2015) judged the school was making ‘reasonable progress’ towards the removal of special measures.  Inspectors said teaching standards were rising and the LA was working effectively with the school.  The new interim head had ‘established positive relations with all members of the school community.’
    It was after this, when the school was showing signs of improvement, that Morgan intervened and imposed her own IEB.  When Ofsted arrived again for monitoring in June shortly after the new IEB had taken over, inspectors said the school was now NOT making enough progress to get out of special measures.  Although most of the staff were working hard a small number were anxious about changes  Staff morale was not good, inspectors said.
    The LA had already said it was exploring academy conversion so it wasn’t necessary for Morgan to impose this ‘solution’.  This raises the question why it was necessary for Morgan to intervene and about how far her intervention caused the improvement to be reversed.

  3. The school was put in special measures in Jan 2014.  The LA had noticed a decline in performance at the school and had already established an Interim Executive Board which was to meet for the first time when Ofsted arrived (Jan 2014).  There had been a ‘strained relationship’ between the school and the LA at the time.
    Ofsted’s first monitoring visit (May 2014) found neither the school’s action plan nor the LA’s plan were fit for purpose.  However, the next two monitoring visits (September 2014 and January 2015) judged the school was making ‘reasonable progress’ towards the removal of special measures.  Inspectors said teaching standards were rising and the LA was working effectively with the school.  The new interim head had ‘established positive relations with all members of the school community.’
    It was after this, when the school was showing signs of improvement, that Morgan intervened and imposed her own IEB.  When Ofsted arrived again for monitoring in June shortly after the new IEB had taken over, inspectors said the school was now NOT making enough progress to get out of special measures.  Although most of the staff were working hard a small number were anxious about changes  Staff morale was not good, inspectors said.
    The LA had already said it was exploring academy conversion so it wasn’t necessary for Morgan to impose this ‘solution’.  This raises the question why it was necessary for Morgan to intervene and about how far her intervention caused the improvement to be reversed.

Let us know what you think...